Wednesday, August 04, 2010

Superman & Lois


I heard the news yesterday that Tom Mankiewicz, perhaps best known for his work on the Superman script, passed away. Superman is, in my opinion, the best movie ever made - so I thought I would do a small tribute to that on the blog today.

This is my version of the "You've got me? Who's got you?!" moment - one of my favorites in the movie. Do you have a favorite moment from Superman the movie?

14 comments:

Dave Jones said...

One of my favorite moments was Clark changing in the revolving doors and comes out changed as Superman. The Pimp nearby just says something like "That's a bad outfit! Whoa!".

Another great sketch Chris!

Alan said...

Following on from Dave, I like the gag where Clark gives a look up and down to the modern public phone, ie, not a box. But also, the rooftop interview with Lois. so charming and real. Christopher Reeve is so natural. I was interested to see the contract with that scene as it was used in screen tests, available on the dvd extras. There is nothing of the same realness. Done in the commentary says they rehearsed the scene a lot and it shows. Especially love the complete believability Reeve brings to the 'corn' "I never lie" line. So many others...

Bradford said...

yeah, great movie-

I think part of what made it work so well for me as an adult- was how much Reeves filled the role of Clark Kent. As a kid all, I wanted to see was Superman (of course!) but later I really appreciated the comical aspects of the buffoonish Clark Kent. For me- one of my favorite moments was when Clark caught the bullet while they were being mugged- then with a sly smile drops it to the side after-but lets Lois think he fainted. classic.

Andrew Wickliffe said...

I want a print.
Seriously

laurent Sieurac said...

Really amazind stuff...as usual!!
I really fond of how you handled the B&W!

Great moment of the movie!!!

Bosch Fawstin said...

Fantastic

Matt W. said...

Such an inspiring piece. This one fills me with all of the awe and wonderment that I first felt as a kid. Thanks for tapping into that well of inspiration, Chris. This one's a beaut!

Patman said...

I kinda like that slow flying arc from inside the Fortress of Solitude to the cut to street level Metropolis, the musical score swelling through the cut.

Craig Zablo said...

Wonderful piece. The moment that came to mind from the movie was already mentioned... the look Reeves gives at the "modern" phone booth.

Kurt Wood said...

For me, the scene with Clark almost telling Lois he's Superman after their rooftop interview is brilliant. Chris Reeve takes off his glasses, straightens his posture, and lowers his voice an octive and becomes a totally differnt guy before our eyes.Pure magic! In that one moment, you can see why no one would thik Clark and Superman were the same guy.

Kurt said...

I'm actually a bigger fan of Superman II (and I'm a huge Richard Lester fan), which Mack had a hand in too. Mank also wrote Diamonds Are Forever, Live And Let Die, and The Man With The Golden Gun.

damon said...

wow nice

Pastrami said...

Another part of the scene that was mentioned above during the interview...when he tells Lois that her underpants are pink and she moves back behind the iron that had shielded her when she first asked.

M.O.R said...

I have to say, I love that moment too, the moment you have drawn here, and that is the reason why many modern comic book movies are not as good as Superman.

I personally hated Spider-man (2002) because there was none of those moments. The whole movie feels like "Oh, I've seen that before, I'm not impressed" whereas it should be a "My God, he's spinning webs from his hands, climbing walls, leaping about with incredible agility etc," and the MAcy Gray cameo ruins it. Lacked heart.

With Superman the movie, we get a realistic responce to a flying man, who can lift planes, and trains, fly, has xray vision and laser vision, can break the sound barrier, is faster than a speeding bullet, and is all about doing good and protecting the world.

Brando is really convincing as his dad, and shows great emotion at the though of sending his only son to Earth, never seeing the man he will become, or what will happen to him, and it goes without saying that Reeves is amazing.

There is no greater praise to be heaped on an actor than saying that, for 32 years, nobody in live action film, and I mean nobody, has surpassed his Superman. Hell, Superman Returns was just a bad rehash of the first film, with no heart. It says alot that nobody can bring the same warmth and heart to the role that he has. Not Tom Welling, not Dean Cain, nobody.